Hipstamatic Polaroid!  I had been mulling over the idea of picking up a Polaroid for a little while.  The raft of Hipstatwatic photos on my Facebook timeline was starting to pique my interest, but being so in love with film and things that click-whine-whir-and-grind kept me thinking ‘Polaroid…’ Then James Franco did it, and that was all the cool points I would ever need to get motived. So I hit up the web and found Impossible and their Flickr presence.  From their Flickr group I found the inestimable Laura Watt and her outstanding Polaroid photos.  She counselled me against a (very expensive) SLR 680 and instead to consider the cheap and cheerful Spectra! I researched what Polaroid/Impossible film I would need to buy and calculated that £1.75/shot wasn’t totally horrific. I hit eBay and found a tested, ready to work Spectra, placed an expensive order with Impossible and then set about watching a lot of videos. Well, today the film arrived and I could-not-freaking-wait-to-give-it-a-go.  So, after learning everything I needed could from watching and reading, I followed my own 8-step programme and got a result.  Imma share the 8-step programme with you.  Send no money now. Step 1: Prop Spectra up on Army Figure in the vain hope that it will make your photo look cooler. Step 2: Make sure the ROLLERS ARE CLEAN (this seems to be a tick like paranoia amongst the Polaroid web community)   Step 3: Find some film.  In this instance I was too scared to practise on the hyper-sensitive and pernickety Impossible offerings, so I used some old Polaroid stock. Step 4: Insert the film.  But, since this is a (to me) untested camera, and I had read a few too many horror stories of cameras cycling (and ruining) the whole film pack, I decided to…   Step 5: …only close the film door once the camera was soundly in a dark bag. Step 6: The Spectra was very well behaved and only exited the 'dark slide’.  Which, upon the sound advice of the Polaroid web community, I will retain.   Step 7: Find a model.  The (very) Good Lady Dr Blackmore offered (read: was hounded into submission).   Step 8: Compose and fire!  My Polaroid camera being a Spectra, I was able to hold the shutter button for a few seconds and practise ejecting the film straight into a bag/box/somewhere very dark.  I totally forgot to then keep the film warm, as is the advice on the box.  But I got a shot.  Happy boy.  

Hipstamatic
Polaroid! 

I had been mulling over the idea of picking up a Polaroid for a little while.  The raft of Hipstatwatic photos on my Facebook timeline was starting to pique my interest, but being so in love with film and things that click-whine-whir-and-grind kept me thinking ‘Polaroid…’

Then James Franco did it, and that was all the cool points I would ever need to get motived.

So I hit up the web and found Impossible and their Flickr presence.  From their Flickr group I found the inestimable Laura Watt and her outstanding Polaroid photos.  She counselled me against a (very expensive) SLR 680 and instead to consider the cheap and cheerful Spectra!

I researched what Polaroid/Impossible film I would need to buy and calculated that £1.75/shot wasn’t totally horrific.

I hit eBay and found a tested, ready to work Spectra, placed an expensive order with Impossible and then set about watching a lot of videos.

Well, today the film arrived and I could-not-freaking-wait-to-give-it-a-go.  So, after learning everything I needed could from watching and reading, I followed my own 8-step programme and got a result.  Imma share the 8-step programme with you.  Send no money now.

Step 1:
Prop Spectra up on Army Figure in the vain hope that it will make your photo look cooler.

Step 2:
Make sure the ROLLERS ARE CLEAN (this seems to be a tick like paranoia amongst the Polaroid web community)

 

Step 3:
Find some film.  In this instance I was too scared to practise on the hyper-sensitive and pernickety Impossible offerings, so I used some old Polaroid stock.

Step 4:
Insert the film.  But, since this is a (to me) untested camera, and I had read a few too many horror stories of cameras cycling (and ruining) the whole film pack, I decided to…

 

Step 5:
…only close the film door once the camera was soundly in a dark bag.

Step 6:
The Spectra was very well behaved and only exited the 'dark slide’.  Which, upon the sound advice of the Polaroid web community, I will retain.

 

Step 7:
Find a model.  The (very) Good Lady Dr Blackmore offered (read: was hounded into submission).

 

Step 8:
Compose and fire!  My Polaroid camera being a Spectra, I was able to hold the shutter button for a few seconds and practise ejecting the film straight into a bag/box/somewhere very dark.  I totally forgot to then keep the film warm, as is the advice on the box.  But I got a shot.  Happy boy.

 

Clive SomervilleComment